Album Overview: J.D. Pinkus – Fungus Shui

&#13 &#13 &#13 &#13 &#13 &#13 Blake Michelle August 29th, 2021 – 9:00 AM &#13…

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Album Review: J.D. Pinkus – Fungus Shui

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Not living up to its comprehensive opportunity

If your music is “bare-bones,” then people bare-bones far better be amazing. It’s unusual to think about restraint coming from a member of the Butthole Surfers, the only band with an anal sex reference in their title to get everywhere around the mainstream. Nevertheless, on his next solo document, their bassist J.D. Pinkus eschews tape enhancing and flashy effects in lieu of a banjo, his voice and just a few publish-generation methods. When this stripped-down formulation can occasionally end result in immersion, Fungus Shui is far too scant and repetitive to really suck listeners in. This is baffling, specified that the report came from a man who cut his teeth on one of the strangest and most transgressive cult functions close to.

On paper, there’s no reason that Pinkus just can’t pull off a region album. The banjo across each his solo data appears crisp, discordant and powerful, and his guttural voice really should match ideal in. He can even compose a bouncy melody or two when he puts his mind to it. “Good Hassle,” one of the ideal tracks off his 1st launch, Retain on the Grass, attributes the closest point to a pop hook Pinkus has at any time crafted, and “You Seem Amusing When You Cry,” from Fungus Shui, picks up the slack with an impassioned vocal supply and thoughts-melting guitar shredding.

Regrettably, there is not a lot on Fungus Shui that matches this energy. It is a slower, far more atmospheric album, which would be great if those people atmospheres essentially connected. On Keep on the Grass, “I Like the Way You Have Fun” proved he could craft a tense, ghostly atmosphere with dreamy vocals and tape layering that cranked up the suspense. It also managed to do so in 5 minutes somewhat than 8scenario in point: the clunky opening track on Fungus Shui, “Fungus Shui Trinity.”

As a discordant banjo rings out and develops, the blend is flooded with whooshing appears and incessant warbles. Even as guitars split out into a chorus result during the song’s closing minutes, nothing at all contributes to any sort of crescendo and the track just sort of stumbles towards a summary. The album honestly is not psychedelic plenty of there are warbles and tape activations on “Pussyfoot Down” and “Woke Up Lifeless,” but which is about it. The opener is also the only position with visible vocal manipulation in an attempt to sound desire-like as Pinkus hoarsely moans from someplace in the back of the mix.

Pinkus is not a poor performer, and he knows his restrictions and how to use them, specially on tracks like “Shovel” and “Slow Crawl,” where by he leverages his unrefined singing into an helpful feeling of instability. But without any interesting layering or mixing, these eight minuscule tracks have a tendency to meander and leave no impact. When an album is this quick, with numerous tracks scarcely eclipsing two minutes, each individual note has to rely, and, possessing come from a band that was not regarded for its refinement, Pinkus appears like he’s in an unideal place to realize that.

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